Taskforce Orion training to crack down on child exploitation offenders

Written by admin on 11/07/2018 Categories: 南京夜网

Detective Superintendent Cheryl Scanlon said the age, occupation and location of each child exploitation offender was varied. Photo: Phil CarrickA pilot training program for detectives aimed at cracking down on child exploitation offences across Queensland has wrapped up on the Gold Coast and Logan, with six people arrested since it the program began.
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Gold Coast and Logan detectives completed a pilot training program under Taskforce Orion aimed at improving response times to child exploitation investigations pushed out by the Child Protection and Investigation Unit.

Child Safety and Sexual Crimes Group Detective Superintendent Cheryl Scanlon said officers who had gone through the pilot training were provided with equipment that would increase their capability to deal with offenders involved in child exploitation material.

“What Taskforce Orion has allowed us to do is take specialised training teams region to region, travelling around the state to increase not only the equipment that is needed to retrieve material from people who are offending online, but also to conduct investigations around possession, distribution and manufacturing of child exploitation material,” she said.

“The training course is quite intensive, people need to have good skills in the technology space, it is obviously quite difficult work, when you are dealing with images of children and they are child exploitation images.”

Superintendent Scanlon said, since January 1, 44 people had been arrested on over 170 offences of child exploitation, possession, distribution and contact offences across Queensland.

Their ages ranged from 16 to 64 and occupations included a landscape gardener, a student, a bottle shop attendee, a teacher and a retiree.

“This work is the sort of investigation that is not isolated to any particular group in our community, it happens in all parts of community, across all walks of life,” she said.

The Orion team worked alongside the existing Taskforce Argos and focused on people who used peer-to-peer networks, or the so-called Darknet, to share child pornography.

Superintendent Scanlon said the training was integral to ensuring same-day responses to time sensitive investigations and confirmed two international specialists were brought in to help classify child exploitation images.

“It might be that we receive a job, it will be pushed out to a region, we can have detectives out the same day, same day response if they have the ability and training and technology to be able to progress the investigation immediately,” she said.

“The timeliness of that is critical, particularly when you have children in a house it gives us greater footprint across the state to do that work.

“It is allowing us to create a footprint into the future to give us better capability to respond quicker and if there are children in those houses that we locate those children and maintain their safety.

“Out of the Orion funding we have recruited some international specialists from Europe and America to come on board to be additional image classifiers, to classify if an image is child exploitation material.”

Regional Crime Coordinator Superintendent Dave Hutchinson said 20 detectives from Gold Coast and Logan had been involved in the Taskforce Orion pilot training program that resulted in the arrest of six offenders.

“Those people are attached to our Child Protection Units both here on Gold Coast and Logan,” he said.

“Working in conjunction with State Crime Command, so far since training was given in early April, we have arrested six offenders on 21 charges.”

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Hampton Park schools in lockdown as police hunt four robbers

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Hampton schools were in lockdown as police hunted four men. Photo: Nine News Hampton Park schools were in lockdown on Tuesday morning as police hunted four men who robbed a Pakenham family while they were home.
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Police phoned to alert Hampton Park Secondary School after the four men stormed the home on Ahern Road about 10.30am.

A woman and child were inside at the time. Hampton Park Primary and Secondary in lockdown due to a @VictoriaPolice investigation which begun in Pakenham #9Newspic.twitter南京夜网/LBTlSKsNRr— Nine News Melbourne (@9NewsMelb) May 31, 2016

Two men fled the home in a stolen Suzuki Swift, while the other two left in a white Ford Territory.

Police located the Suzuki in Pride Court, Hampton Park.

Sniffer dogs then helped in the arrest of one man in nearby in Andrew Court.

The other men are still wanted.

Hampton Secondary principal David Finnerty said he alerted nearby Hampton Park Primary School after receiving the call from police.

Both schools were in lockdown for around an hour from about 11.30am.

“We received a phone call from police that there was a police incident in the area,” Mr Finnerty said.

“On the basis on that, the school went into lockdown.”

Hampton Primary assistant principal Liz Davey said that school was also closed as a precaution.

“We have sent a letter to parents congratulating students and staff on their calm handling of the situation that was out of our control,” she said.

It is understood River Gum Primary School was also in lockdown.

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Darts champion hits target

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Bull’s eye: Collie Eagles darts player Lee Chapman has qualified for this year’s Australian Darts Championships.
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COLLIE EAGLES darts playerLee Chapman has been selected for the Western Australian state team to compete inthe Australian Darts Championships 2016.

Mr Chapman placed within the top 16 averages in the state championships, earning him the chance tocompete in the state side trials last month.

He played seven gamesin the state trials doubles tournament on Saturday, May 28 and 15 games inthesingles eventon May 29.

Mr Chapman was selected for the side, featuring eight players and a reserve,byplacing the seventh highest average in the trials.

Mr Chapman said he was overwhelmed byhis selection for theside and the chance to representWA.

“I’m just over the moon, to get Western Australia on my back and to represent my state,” he said.

“I’ve given it all I’ve got this year and my darts are really starting to pay off for me.

“I’ve been putting in a few extra hours on the board and it’s just working for me, I seem to have found a nice rhythm and flow with the board and it’s going well.

“I’m just stoked to get a chance to represent the state, it means everything.”

Mr Chapman said darts has turned from a hobby into a passion over the past few years.

“It was about ten years ago I started playing, a lot of my friends played and they were always playing on Wednesday nights,” he said.

“I’ve played since I was a young fella,I’ve always had a dart board up at home, but I had never played competitively before andI found out that I wasn’t too bad at it so I took it up.

“It started off In B-grade in Collie playing for the Premier Hotel and I spent a couple of years at that and then I switched over to the Workers Club for a couple of years in A-grade.

“We formed a team that wanted to travel up to Mandurah because we wanted to expose ourselves as better competition.”

Mr Chapman has playedin the Mandurah, Port Kennedy, and Rockingham leagues in six of the past seven years.

He and darts partner Peter Rowe were required tocompete in the leagues to be recognised forthe state championships.

Mr Chapman had averaged 93 over a four week period in the Rockingham league this season.

The nationalchampionships willtake place from July 28 to August 6 in Bendigo, Victoria.

Mr Chapman said Collie has developed a proud darts culture that accepts people of all skill sets.

“You just need to go down to one of your local clubs on Wednesday nightif you’re a manorif you’re a lady go down to one of your local clubs Tuesday night, there’s about seven or eight clubs in Collie for both,” he said.

“There is always spots,Collie’s got a really healthy darts league –there is aboutfive A-grade sides, about eightB-grade sides and about 10 C-grade sides.

“There’s like 220 people that have played for the Collie Darts Association this year, that’s just men –Collie has one of the biggest, if not the biggest, darts associations in WA.

“Our club, the Collie Eagles, we’re actually short of players so if anyone wants to come down and have a go they’re guaranteed to get a game.”

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Here’s your chance to influence policy

Written by admin on 19/08/2019 Categories: 南京夜网

Resident’s view: Lavinia Wood says a population limit must be determined for the Redlands.LOCALS will get the chance to influence government policy during a looming review of the South East Queensland Regional Plan.
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A first step in the process will occur on Monday from 6pm to 7.30pm when residents can take part in the Shaping SEQ Program

Redland City Mayor Karen Williams said it was critical Redlanders took part.

“The State Government will be reviewing the SEQ Regional Plan and this is an opportunity for residents to share their great ideas on what they want to see included,” she said.

“The proposed SEQ Regional Plan will for the first time include a 50-year strategic vision for the region as well as more detailed provisions until 2041 which will guide many of our local plans, so it is important residents are part of this conversation.”

Cr Williams said city planning was an important topic in the Redlands and the event would feature a talk by New York City’s project for public spaces senior vice president Ethan Kent.

“The State Government will also be holding a series of information booths over the next six weeks, including at Wellington Point on Sunday 19 June and everyone should stay up to date by visiting the Shaping SEQ website 梧桐夜网shapingseq南京夜网419论坛,” Cr Williams said.

With the south east corner being one of the fastest growing regions in Australia, it wasvital to balance growth with the things people loved about the region.

“According to State Government forecasts there is expected to be an extra 2 million people in SEQ by 2041, with an extra 900,000 more dwellings needed to accommodate these people,” she said.

“Although the Redlands is expected to see only modest growth in the near future compared to our neighbouring cities, there is no doubt the wider south east Queensland landscape will affect us, so we need to be part of this important conversation.’’

Community Alliance for Responsible Planning spokeswoman Lavinia Wood said any review of the plan had to recognise that the region had a population carrying capacity.

Without this, it would not be possible to maintain a genuine balance between the environment, economy and community.

“As this applies to the Redlands, so it applies to south east Queensland,” she said. “Right now as we are developing houses, we are annhilating koalas.We have to stop.

“The Redlands is a microcosm of south east Queensland, Australia and the world.”

After a six-week engagement period the government will use the community feedback to inform the review of the South East Queensland Regional Plan.

“Once finalised this plan will provide the blueprint for South East Queensland, helping to plan for projected growth and how it is accommodated,’’ Cr Williams said.”…The only way to ensure the Redlands is front of mind is for us to have our say.”

The regional plan will look at topics like housing types, access to employment and better access to open space and recreation.

Shaping SEQ engagements: Thought leadership session Monday 6 June 6-7.30pm,Cleveland Library, Corner Bloomfield and Middle Streets, Cleveland Qld 4163, RSVP qld.gov419论坛/shapingseq.Information booth: Sunday June 19, Wellington Point Reserve, 10am to 2pm.This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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Helmet donations exceed expectations

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DONATIONS: Linda Crocker, Ben Jeffrey, 11, on Barnaby, Reliabuild Group representative Glenn Blackney, Owen Absolom, 4, on Tia, Reliabuild Group representative Scott Marks and Mimi Paulin. Photo: Georgina BaylyCrowson Park Riding for the Disabled has been overwhelmed by the support after their recent call out for help to replace old riding helmets.
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The equestrian helmets now need to meet Australian Standard 3838 and Crowson Park needed two in each size which at a cost of about $80 each was a huge financial stress to the association.

Each riding session has two participants and now those participants can be better matched in age as the association has access to helmets in the same sizes.

Crowson Park president Linda Gaffaney said she was just astounded by the support from the community.

“This allows us to be more flexible with our lesson pairings,” she said.

“The standards now aren’t for adaptable helmets so we needed to upgrade, purchase 18 with two in each size.”

With riders aged from three to 66-years-old it is necessary to have the ability to change riders into different and, sometimes, more-cohesivepairings.

Ms Gaffaney said there were large and small donations towards the helmets from various people and groups within the community.

“We encourage all our donors to drop in and have a look at our lessons on Tuesday and Wednesdays.

Reliabuild group (pictured) were just one of the many donors to help Crowson Park Riding for the Disabled toreach their target of 18 helmets.

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What’s on around the town

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YOU BEAUTY: Garden guru Peter Tristram will talk about unusual bromeliads at the society’s next meeting.LEARN TAI CHI: Try a free introductory class at Baulkham Hills or Castle Hill. Bookings essential. Details: 9686 2282 or 0421 282 833.
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LEARN TAI CHI: Free introductory classes of this ancient and healthy art are on offer around the region.

RETIREES MEET: Sydney Hills Branch of the Association of Independent Retirees will meet on Friday, June 3 from 10,30am at Beecroft Presbyterian Church Hall, Welham Street, Beecroft. The guest speaker will be the Federal MP Alex Hawke. Recently retired citizens and baby boomers welcome. Keep abreast of the changes which are likely to affect you and your income in the future. Details: Lauris Rennie, 9634 1186.

TAKE A WALK: Wanderers Bushwalking and Outdoor Club Club meets on the second Friday of the month from 8pm at Crestwood Community Centre, Crestwood Drive, Baulkham Hills. The next meeting is June 10. Details: 梧桐夜网bushwalking.org419论坛/-wanderers or phone 9639 9738.

UNIQUE PLANTS: Bromeliad Society of Australia will hold their next meeting on Saturday, June 11 from noon at Federation Pavilion, Castle Hill Showground. Guest speaker will be bromeliad guru Peter Tristram who will discuss his recent trip to South America and his pursuit of unique bromeliads growing in their natural habitat. Free admission. All welcome. Details: 梧桐夜网bromeliad.org419论坛 or phone 0408 202 269.

BIRTHDAY DINNER: North Rocks Evening VIEW Club meets from 7.30pm on Tuesday, June 14 at Pennant Hills Golf Club, corner Copeland Road and Burns Road South, Beecroft. It’s the club’s 37th birthday. Allwelcome. Details: Glen, 9871 2788.

GREEN THUMBS: Pennant Hills Garden Club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month from 10.15am at Pennant Hills Bowling Club, 52 Yarra Road, Pennant Hills. Next meeting is June 22. Guest speakers andgarden visits. Details: Louise, 9484 5008.

STICK TO YOUR KNITTING: Knitting and crochet group meets every Tuesday 10am-1pm at Restore Church, 47 Britannia Road, Castle Hill. Knit, crochet, learn and share your craft in this friendly, comfortable atmosphere. Free off-street parking. Experienced craft speakers and workshops are organised throughout the year as well as outings to yarn stores and craft shows. Members also support charity organisations Wrapt with Love, Operation Christmas Child, Trauma Teddies and others. All welcome. Details: Janette, 0409 905 018 or email [email protected]南京夜网.

Entries for this diary from community groups and non-profit organisations need to reach us nine days before anticipated publication. Because of space restrictions, there is no guarantee that entries will run. Email your details to [email protected]南京夜网419论坛.This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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What’s your relay motivation?

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REGISTER NOW: Relay for Life chairman Daniel Kisela with Dougal Bear ahead of last night’s Relay for Life launch at the Good Guys. Picture: Les Smith
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Even after 14 years of Relay for Life in Wagga, organisers are still working towards making each event more successful than the last.

The official launch of the 2016 event will be held this eveningand chairman Daniel Kisela said participants will notice some changes.

After falling short of $200,000last year, organisers are lowering their target for 2016 to $180,000.

Teams who bank more than $2000 by September 30 will be put in the draw to win a prize after more teams than ever banked no money last year.

“We keep learning every year but we know what worked last year,” Mr Kisela said.

Mr Kisela said every team holds different motivations for relaying and part of the lure of the event is getting to know what they are.

Strangers meet and form a common bond as people of all ages strive for one thing –a cure.

“It’s such an emotional rollercoaster on the day,” Mr Kisela said.

“It’s a great event.

“Raising money is one aspect of it but you’re engaging with complete strangers.”

Relay for Life will be held fromOctober 8 to 9.

Registrations can be madenow via the Relay for Life website.

Those who register at the Good Guys at the launch from 6pm to 8pm tonight will receive the early bird discount and $20 of store credit.

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Poole set to host Relay

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VENUE: Amanda Cooper at Poole Oval, the site of this year’s Relay For Life in Port Lincoln.
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THE Port Lincoln Relay for Life has taken another step towards being ready for the 2016 event after finalising this year’s relay venue.

The Relay for Life Port Lincoln Committee have announced Poole Oval will host the 2016 event.

Past events had been held at Ravendale Oval.

Committee secretary and compliance coordinator Amanda Cooper said the venue was finalised last Monday after communication with Boston Football Club.

“We were really excited when they said they could help us by having it here,” she said.

Things are starting to fall into place for the Port Lincoln event which takes place on October 22 and 23.

More than 40 participants in13 teams, one of the most recent additions being a team from the Port Lincoln Youth Advisory Committee.

The committee is hoping to meet its target of between 15 to 20 teams taking part.

Miss Cooper said despite some hiccups at the start things were coming together.

“The biggest thing was securing the venue so we could have somewhere for it to run,” she said.

Poole Oval.

The focus for the committee is now on gathering survivors and carers together for the event’s Survivor and Carer Walk.

Cancer survivors and carers are invited to register on the day to do a lap around the oval at 2pm followed by afternoon tea.

Miss Cooper said survivors andcarers can register on the day.

Entertainment for the event is also yet to be finalised.

Meanwhile the committee is hoping to see more fundraising from teams in the next few weeks.

Nearly $600has been raised so far with the target set at $42,000.

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Barrister to return to Sydney as an MP? Duncan Brakell set to stand for Orange seat

Written by admin on 19/07/2019 Categories: 南京夜网

IN THE RUNNING: The Nationals Orange branch chairman Duncan Brakell. Photo: STEVE GOSCH
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THE competition for The Nationals’ preselection for the seat of Orange is becoming fierce, with Orange branch chairman Duncan Brakell announcing his intention to stand.

Mr Brakell, 44, moved to a 45-acre property at Spring Terrace from Sydney almost four years ago with his wife Karen and daughter Abigail, now 5, with his second daughter Madeline, 3, born at Orange Health Service.

“Karen and I believed that Sydney didn’t hold the values we were aspiring to and we had Abigail, who was two at the time, so we started to think about what sort of future did we want for Abigail’s schooling and access to medical services and other families with young children and we recognised the value of a country upbringing,” he said.

“In winter of 2012, we left Sydney and the central heating failed and it was snowing – it was quite the move but that didn’t stop us.”

Mr Brakell, a barrister, has run his own business in Orange and he joined The Nationals in March 2013, serving as the Orange branch chairman for the past three years.

He has also been involved in the Spring Terrace Water Group and represented the Orange Ratepayers Association to challenge councillor Kevin Duffy’s eligibility to run for Orange City Council.

“I was already thinking about moving into politics and politics at the state and federal level tends to be a natural progression from the bar,” he said.

If successful at preselection and the byelection, Mr Brakell said his main priorities were securing adequate resources for regional schools and health services, economic diversification and value adding to orchard, wool and meat businesses, and improving freight efficiency through the inland rail project.

“There’s a tremendous opportunity for the Orange electorate to take a regional focus and in doing so, recognise each local area has its own diverse agriculture, horticulture, commerce and industries,” he said.

“We cannot have kids falling behind our coastal counterparts – there’s a vicious rumour that Malcolm Turnbull’s government is in fact working on seizing the Gonski funding and if we can properly allocate the funds to where it’s properly required, then I don’t think it will fall behind.”

With council amalgamations a core issue for departing member for Orange Andrew Gee, Mr Brakell said Cabonne Council had taken the right argument to the NSW Land and Environment Court to challenge the merger with Orange and Blayney, but he would seek to build a close relationship with the larger council if court action failed.

“There were issues with the way the current government disclosed or more importantly, didn’t disclose its proper intentions in enforcing amalgamations and certainly the government needs to be taken to task on its disclosure obligations,” he said.

“For the Cabonne shire and the Blayney shire, the fight would have to be taken to Orange City Council and the message would have to be clear we want fair representation on this council.”

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Coles underpaid staff and cut penalty rates: tribunal

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Almost twomillion Aussies to get pay riseSupermarket giant Coles underpaid its employees and cut penalty rates in a cosy deal with the shop assistants’ union that has cost low-paid workers perhaps $70 million a year.
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In a landmark decision, the full bench of the Fair Work Commission found some of the 77,000 workers at Coles faced “significant” underpayment from the deal, first revealed by Fairfax Media in 2015. Part time and casual workers were especially hard hit.

Tens of thousands of Coles workers have been paid penalty rates that are lower than the workplace award – the basic wages safety net.

Backdown … Coles has been told to pay higher penalty rates.

The commission’s ruling on an appeal by Coles trolley worker Duncan Hart is a humiliating judgement for Coles and the conservative Shop, Distributive and Allied Employees Association (SDA), the ALP’s largest union affiliate.

It casts a cloud over a string of similar deals across the retail and fast food sectors including with the country’s two largest employers, Woolworths and McDonald’s.

And it comes at an uncomfortable time for Opposition Leader Bill Shorten and the ACTU, who have made the defence of penalty rates a key part of the election campaign.

All workplace agreements are meant to pass the “better off overall test” (BOOT), which is intended to ensure workers are paid more under workplace agreements than the award.

The Fair Work decision found the Coles agreement failed the test.

The tribunal has given Coles – Australia’s third largest employer – 10 days to provide undertakings to either compensate employees left worse off by working shifts with low penalties, or to overhaul rosters. If it fails to do so, the agreement will be ripped up.

The ruling comes after Fairfax Media this month revealed McDonald’s is also underpaying its Australian workers tens of millions of dollars a year under a deal struck with the SDA.

Some McDonald’s workers were paid nearly one-third less than the award, under a 2013 deal approved by the Fair Work Commission.

Fairfax Media revealed the underpayment scandal at Coles nearly a year ago, based on work by Josh Cullinan, a senior official at the National Tertiary Education Union, who has researched the Coles deal in a personal capacity.

On Tuesday Mr Cullinan said the tribunal’s most significant finding was that the agreement should never have passed the “better off overall test”.

“Make no mistake; if the Coles deal did not pass the [test] then the agreements for Woolworths, the Super Retail Group, Bunnings, McDonald’s … they are all likely not to pass,” he said.

“Over the next little while, we will have to see some sort of analysis of these agreements to find out how they came to be made.”

Mr Cullinan’s research on Coles found some low-paid workers were as much as $3500 a year worse off than the award. Last year Mr Cullinan, backed by the meatworkers’ union, challenged the deal at the Fair Work Commission.

As a result, Coles was forced to provide undertakings to lift casual loadings from 20 to 25 per cent and pay young workers more. Now it has also been told to pay higher penalty rates for weekend and night work.

Mr Hart, who triggered the Fair Work full bench hearing, said the tribunal ruling was “as clear a victory as we could have hoped for”.

He said the decision raised questions about deals struck across the retail and fast food sector by the SDA. “This is a repudiation of the SDA’s cosy deals with bosses,” Mr Hart said.

A Coles spokesman defended above inflation pay increases in its workplace agreements and said the company would “respond to today’s decision in due course”.

They would not comment on how much the decision could cost it.

In a written statement, SDA national secretary Gerard Dwyer said the union would review the tribunal decision.

“The SDA welcomes any move that improves the wages and conditions of any workers in Coles.”

Mr Dwyer has refused Fairfax Media requests for interviews in recent weeks about his union’s deals with both Coles and McDonald’s

Greens employment and industrial relations spokesman Adam Bandt attacked Coles for the underpayments, and praised those who had “courageously” stood up for weekend rates of pay.

“I want people to join their unions so that their unions can stand up for them, but doing rotten deals with Australia’s largest companies and trading away penalty rates isn’t the way to attract them.”

Opinion: moment of great shame for ColesThis is a moment of great shame for Australia’s ailing union movement and for one of this country’s most significant companies.

Australia largest private sector union, the Shop, Distributive and Allied Employees Association (SDA), has been caught out.

The ruse? Trading off the penalty rates and casual loadings of vulnerable, low paid workers in exchange, in many cases, for barely a handful of coins in extra hourly pay.

Tens of thousands of workers are worse off as a consequence.

It defies belief that Coles and the SDA didn’t know that they were agreeing to a deal that left some low paid workers as much as $3500 a year short of their entitlements.

The landmark Fair Work Commission decision is a stunning indictment, finding that the deal with Coles did not pass the “better off overall test”.

Put simply, this is the legal requirement that workers should be paid more in a workplace agreement than they are under the award, the basic safety net of wages and conditions.

This is not the only questionable deal inked by the “shoppies” union with big retailers.

It is likely up to half a million workers in Australia are being underpaid due to cosy deals struck between big companies and the SDA. That includes agreements struck with Woolworths and McDonald’s.

Just over a week ago Fairfax Mediarevealedthat some workers at McDonald’s were nearly a third worse off than the award with underpayment across the company of at least $50 million a year.

Both ACTU secretary Dave Oliver and Labor leader Bill Shorten have been running a campaign to “protect” penalty rates this federal election.

But instead of a sober self-assessment in the wake of the commission’s decision, all we got on Tuesday was evasion and pathetic spin from Oliver.

He defended the McDonald’s agreement (where young workers on $10 an hour are being underpaid) and said the commission’s decision in the Coles case showed the system is “working”.

It only ‘worked’ because the cosy deal was exposed by Fairfax Media a year ago, helped by the courage and research skills of an official from another union, Josh Cullinan.

The promise to protect penalty rates now looks like a sad joke from a labour movement with too few union members and far too many unions dominated by political hacks masquerading as officials.

Working conditions in Australia for low paid vulnerable workers, particularly temporary foreign workers, are getting worse. In nearly all cases there is no union representing them.

When the union is the SDA, sadly, vulnerable workers are probably better off with no union at all.

The benefit for the SDA in striking these deals is that the big employers are happy to have theirrepresentatives on site, signing up members.

That gives it influence in Labor, wherethe Catholic-dominated SDA uses its numbers to try block social policy change such as marriage equality. On the back of young workers, this union bolsters its conservative social agenda.

As for Coles, the third largest employer in Australiahas successfully re-branded itself with slick ads, cheap milk and store makeovers.

But one thing hasn’t changed. In collusion with the SDA it has been ripping its workers off for years. Those worst off? The most vulnerable. The young, and those on casual and part time shifts.

No amount of marketing can hide that.

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Day to remember

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GRAND MEMORIES: Karyl Pearce, Elaine Rapson, Annette Howard and Melva Evans at the opening of the netball clubhouse on Saturday.The memories were fresh, the laughter contagious as four of Maitland’s longest serving members celebrated the opening of the new netball clubhouse on Saturday.
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Karyl Pearce, Elaine Rapson, Annette Howard and Melva Evans reprised memories as they gathered around a photo taken of them in their netball umprie uniforms in 1970.

There were numerous other similar gatherings asMaitland netball drew on a tradition of the past to signal in a new era.

A traditional march past involving team membersfrom all the Maitland Netball Association’s club symbolically marched from the old netball clubrooms to the new headquarters before they were officially opened by Maitland mayor Peter Blackmore.

It was a colourful procession which brought back memories for the mayor and the various life members who were special guests at the ceremony.

NSW Netball president Wendy Archer and presidents and officials from the Newcastle and Charlestown Netball Associations were special guests along withMaitland MP Jenny Aitchison,Maitland City councillors and representatives from The Mutual the major sponsor of Maitland netball.

Maitland Netball Association president Kim Starkey paid tribute to all those from council, state government and the netball association who had been involved in the planning, funding and construction of the new administration and clubhouse building.

TREASURED TIME: Karyl Pearce, Elaine Rapson, Annette Howard and Melva Evans in 1970 when they were photographed in their netball umpire uniforms.

Starkey said past president Bev Surplice, who unfortunately did not live to see the fruition of her dream, was the instigator behind the project 15 years ago.

“Bev had the vision more than 15 years ago that inspired the building of these new facilities for Maitland netball,” she said.“During those 15 years, many committee members have worked tirelessly to see her dream come to fruition.

“The clubhouse has been a joint venture with Maitland council and I would particularly like to that Ben Griffin, senior project architect at Maitland City Council, for all his hard work.

Day to remember The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

Maitland Netball Association president Kim Starkey and Maitland mayor Peter Blackmore receive help from some of Maitland netball’s younger members to officially open the associations new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Maitland Netball Association president Kim Starkey and Maitland mayor Peter Blackmore receive help from some of Maitland netball’s younger members to officially open the associations new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Maitland Netball president Kim Starkey, Netball NSW president Wendy Archer, Maitland Netball secretary Leearna Bennett, umpires co-ordinator Sharon McVean and Maitland committee member Cassie Swalwell. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Karyl Pearce, Elaine Rapson, Annette Howard and Melva Evans with a photo taken of them as netball umpires in 1970. Picture; MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Maitland netball life members Shirley Scholes and Irene Hemsworth. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Charlestown Netball Association’s Gail Mayers and Dianne Pasoce, Maitland’s Barbie Bird, Newcastle Netball Association president Del Saunders and Easts Jenny Fullford. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Maitland MP Jenny Aitchison and Cherryl Clarke. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Rhonda Daniel, Susan McGregor and Wendy Archer. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Vicki Bellamy, Annette Howard, Carolyn Bieman-King, Rosie Bieman, Paula Thomson, Barry Evans and Rae Moss. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Kim Starkey and Leearna Bennett. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The life members gather to cut the cake to mark the official opening.Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

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Letters to the editor

Written by admin on  Categories: 南京夜网

Showing supportfor our dairy farmersWell it looks like the big multi-million dollar companies have bitten off more than they can chew when they took on the dairy farmers.
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We all know and have known for years that the poor farmers do it tough. I am sure that the farmers appreciate now how grateful we are as consumers now they see the support they are getting from their communities. Doesn’t it make you proud to be Australian when we all stand together and say enough is enough. To be able to take a moral stand and bite back at them.

We have let them know that it doesn’t matter how much they discount their product. The cheap milk is soured by the grief of the farmers and their families and until they get a fair deal it will not pass our lips.

We are proud to be behind our farmers in the south-west.

David MacPhail, Warrnambool

Private sector needs to reward farmersMurray Goulburn suppliers are suppressing their power if they remain complacent about the recent farm milk gate price clawback. Whilst the cooperative structure is not what it once was, farmers’ rights in the structure are substantial and should be exercised to ensure that the board’s decision is not tolerated now or in the future.

The clawback has not taken account of the message relayed by Murray Goulburn in the 2015 restructure that‘Murray Goulburn is pursuing an optimum Capital Structure that will see 100 per centsupplier control of the co-operative maintained…This growth strategy has the aim of increasing farm gate returns to our suppliers who are at the heart of our business’.

By signing up to a class action, unit-holding farmers should not be thought of as ‘going after their own’ but rather ensuring that they remain at the heart of the Murray Goulburn business. The action could be brought by way of a potential injunction or compensation for the clawback, which may be financed by the board’s professional indemnity insurers.

It is of course almost to be expected that Murray Goulburn will maintain a strategy of broadcasting a message that any farmer action will damage shareholders and potentially cause the demise of Murray Goulburn, however I think the Murray Goulburn agenda speaking against a class action is clear to all.

Governments cannot sustain handouts. It is up to the private sector to ensure that there is lasting restitution for the dairy farmers and the local economy which they support. As outlined by the Federal Court‘It has been long recognised that shareholder class actions hold corporations and their officers to account above and beyond any penalties imposed in the regulatory regimes and so contribute to a culture of good corporate governance.’

Nb:Although the author is a solicitor, he is not involved in any existing class-action and writes in his capacity as a member of a dairy farming family (non-Murray Goulburn suppliers) with concern for the future of this important industry.

Edward Mahony, Warrnambool

Murray Goulburn’s take on the dairy crisisSince announcing our revised farmgate price five weeks ago, Murray Goulburn Co-operative has been justifiably criticised for letting our farmer-suppliers down and causing industry turmoil.

And while the debate about Murray Goulburn and the dairy industry more broadly will continue for some time, it’s important that it does so with knowledge of the facts.

Australians love their dairy, in fact we have one of the highest rates of dairy consumption in the world. However, the country produces around 35 percent more milk than it can possibly consume and that milk supply has to find a market elsewhere.

Murray Goulburn is Australia’s largest dairy exporter and we derive around half our sales from international markets.

As a result we are more exposed than most Australian dairy companies to the vagaries of commodity markets and foreign exchange. Dairy commodity markets have fallen sharply in the past year, trading at levels not seen since the global financial crisis – when Australian processors were also forced to reduce farmgate milk prices.

Murray Goulburn has navigated this difficult environment by producing dairy food products and added value ingredients which deliver higher returns and reduce exposure to bulk commodities. Ultimately these efforts were not enough.

Supermarket brands have been singled out as one of the causes of dairy’s woes, but in fact the opposite is true. Our 10-year daily pasteurised milk supply contract with Coles is a very good deal for our farmers.It delivers a premium above the farmgate milk price and a guaranteed market for our farmers’ milk. It has helped secure much needed investment in the sector.

So while I applaud the support consumers have shown for the dairy industry, boycotting supermarket brand milk in the end doesn’t help our farmers or our industry.It doesn’t matter which milk you buy, what matters is that you keep buying milk and all the other dairy products you love to consume. Global commodity markets will rebalance in time, but the timing of that recovery is beyond our control.

What is in our control is how we invest our capital to deliver value above whatever commodity markets deliver and that we continue in our efforts to carry our suppliers through this downturn, which is delivering unsustainable milk prices to dairy farmers throughout the world. We remain confident of the long term prospects for Australia’s dairy industry and that improved milk prices will ultimately return for our farmers.

Philip Tracy, chairman Murray Goulburn Co-operative Co. Limited

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Narooma News lettersJune 1

Written by admin on  Categories: 南京夜网

Support our dairy farmersMost of us love our milk, either on our cereal or in our cappuccino.For the past few years ourdairyfarmers have been hit hard with deregulation and the milk price war. It takes a farmer 38 cents to produce a litre of milk and up until recently farmers have been paid 42 cents a litre. Processors such as Murray Goulburn and Fonterra have now decided to paydairyfarmers 37 cents a litre which is less than what it takes the farmer to produce a litre of milk.
南京夜网

For the next few months many farmers now have to survive on being paid just 14 cents a litre to make up the difference from being paid 42 cents a litre back to 37 cents. This has a devastating effect ondairyfarming families causing many of them to walk off their farms. Dairyfarmers generally work 365 days a year working extraordinary hours without the benefits most of us receive in employment such as long service leave, annual leave or medical leave. If we don’t support our diary farmers by paying the correct price for milk we will be buying milk from overseas soon. The milk will be nowhere near the quality of our beautiful Australiandairyfarms where the cows can freely roam in paddocks of fresh green grass.

This community has already seen the timber and fishing industry affected so let’s do all we can to support and sustain our localdairy industry. The next time you buy milk, spare a thought for ourdairyfarmers and buy branded milk.

Rachel Summerell,Verona

Election signsHere we go again with political posters put on trees. The Liberal Party have already placed a sign for Peter Hendy at the Mystery Bay Road turn-off. This is absolute pollution, especially on a lovely big tree contrary to council policy. Please have respect for our trees and residents. I trust council will have them removed post haste. By the way, it’s good to know what Dr Hendy looks like.

Barry Wells, Mystery Bay

Grey nurse sharksWe welcome the increase in the numbers of sharksthis year and hope it is an indication that the species is starting to rebound. But while this summer was encouraging, it will be a long time before we can be confident that the sharks are out of danger.Two recent letters to the Narooma News pushed the opinion that the sharks are not critically endangered. The two letters seem to be based on a complete misunderstanding.“Critically endangered” is a classification used to guide government action as to what to do when the number of a species falls to a point where there are concerns about its survival. Decisions about the classification of sharks are made by the independent NSW Fisheries Scientific Committee, which reviewed the evidence and decided in 2008 that the East Coast Grey Nurse Shark population should be moved from “endangered” status to “critically endangered”, which means “facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the immediate future”.

There has been debate over the years about just how many Grey Nurse Sharks remain, with earlier estimates that put the number at around 300 subsequently raised to around 1500 – 2000, with a sizeable margin of uncertainty due to the inherent difficulties in counting and estimating. However the fact that the Fisheries Scientific Committee has maintained the critically endangered classification shows their numbers remain far too low. A NSW Fisheries discussion paper of 2011 stated that the sharks are “unlikely to be downgraded from their critically endangered status while the population is below a threshold of 5000 individuals”.No-one disputes that the numbers of Grey Nurse Sharks have fallen dramatically. We continue to see photos showing that they face an ongoing threat from hook injuries. Everyone values the image of the South Coast as a place where the natural environment is still largely undisturbed and where native wildlife is plentiful. This is fundamental to our tourist industry. It would be a positive thing for our region and our community if we had a healthy population of Grey Nurse Sharks.

JennyEdwards,Nature Coast Marine Group president

Brumbies and BatsEmily Barton’s recent bat article has suggested involvement of the third tier of Government.Ifthis includes Liberal PeterHendy and Labor Mike Kelly, we will be in trouble.Hendy will be in hiselement welding his “knife”and Andrew will have “fired up” his chain saw.In a bi-partisan move, Major Mike Kelly and Dr Hendy will barrel bomb much of theelectorate with personalized pamphlets, bat contraceptive gas and pellets of NPWS 1080.The initial assault led by GM “Cathy”, wearing a laser-emitting fluorescent skirt,clanging a tambourine and blowing a horn with the “deputy mayor in waitingscuttling behind her. He will be beating a drum and cymbals whilst blowing the bag pipes.

This will certainly disperse some bats from the Catalina Golf course, the Soldiers Club, the Water Gardenand towards Moyura, Turros Heads and Narooma GolfCourse.Every bat will be so frightened they will make alow level “long drop”over the Eurobodalla water supply.

It isbelieved the mayor and NPWSare fast tracking a joint management plan for a combined brumby and bat shoot.This will involve the mayor, the shooters party and HuntFest.To satisfy the environmental movement,ammunition will be designed to temporarily restrict the flying capacity of the bats andoperations will be carried out just before and after milking operations to prevent anydamage to the sheds and bats accidentally disabled by stampeding cattle and brumbies.Several squadrons of specially designed highly pitched“drones” will be released.One cannot dismiss the “crisis “has been engineered by the mayorand three of his supporting councilors.

Peter Bernard,Dalmeny

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