Barrister to return to Sydney as an MP? Duncan Brakell set to stand for Orange seat

Written by admin on 19/07/2019 Categories: 南京夜网

IN THE RUNNING: The Nationals Orange branch chairman Duncan Brakell. Photo: STEVE GOSCH
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THE competition for The Nationals’ preselection for the seat of Orange is becoming fierce, with Orange branch chairman Duncan Brakell announcing his intention to stand.

Mr Brakell, 44, moved to a 45-acre property at Spring Terrace from Sydney almost four years ago with his wife Karen and daughter Abigail, now 5, with his second daughter Madeline, 3, born at Orange Health Service.

“Karen and I believed that Sydney didn’t hold the values we were aspiring to and we had Abigail, who was two at the time, so we started to think about what sort of future did we want for Abigail’s schooling and access to medical services and other families with young children and we recognised the value of a country upbringing,” he said.

“In winter of 2012, we left Sydney and the central heating failed and it was snowing – it was quite the move but that didn’t stop us.”

Mr Brakell, a barrister, has run his own business in Orange and he joined The Nationals in March 2013, serving as the Orange branch chairman for the past three years.

He has also been involved in the Spring Terrace Water Group and represented the Orange Ratepayers Association to challenge councillor Kevin Duffy’s eligibility to run for Orange City Council.

“I was already thinking about moving into politics and politics at the state and federal level tends to be a natural progression from the bar,” he said.

If successful at preselection and the byelection, Mr Brakell said his main priorities were securing adequate resources for regional schools and health services, economic diversification and value adding to orchard, wool and meat businesses, and improving freight efficiency through the inland rail project.

“There’s a tremendous opportunity for the Orange electorate to take a regional focus and in doing so, recognise each local area has its own diverse agriculture, horticulture, commerce and industries,” he said.

“We cannot have kids falling behind our coastal counterparts – there’s a vicious rumour that Malcolm Turnbull’s government is in fact working on seizing the Gonski funding and if we can properly allocate the funds to where it’s properly required, then I don’t think it will fall behind.”

With council amalgamations a core issue for departing member for Orange Andrew Gee, Mr Brakell said Cabonne Council had taken the right argument to the NSW Land and Environment Court to challenge the merger with Orange and Blayney, but he would seek to build a close relationship with the larger council if court action failed.

“There were issues with the way the current government disclosed or more importantly, didn’t disclose its proper intentions in enforcing amalgamations and certainly the government needs to be taken to task on its disclosure obligations,” he said.

“For the Cabonne shire and the Blayney shire, the fight would have to be taken to Orange City Council and the message would have to be clear we want fair representation on this council.”

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Coles underpaid staff and cut penalty rates: tribunal

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Almost twomillion Aussies to get pay riseSupermarket giant Coles underpaid its employees and cut penalty rates in a cosy deal with the shop assistants’ union that has cost low-paid workers perhaps $70 million a year.
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In a landmark decision, the full bench of the Fair Work Commission found some of the 77,000 workers at Coles faced “significant” underpayment from the deal, first revealed by Fairfax Media in 2015. Part time and casual workers were especially hard hit.

Tens of thousands of Coles workers have been paid penalty rates that are lower than the workplace award – the basic wages safety net.

Backdown … Coles has been told to pay higher penalty rates.

The commission’s ruling on an appeal by Coles trolley worker Duncan Hart is a humiliating judgement for Coles and the conservative Shop, Distributive and Allied Employees Association (SDA), the ALP’s largest union affiliate.

It casts a cloud over a string of similar deals across the retail and fast food sectors including with the country’s two largest employers, Woolworths and McDonald’s.

And it comes at an uncomfortable time for Opposition Leader Bill Shorten and the ACTU, who have made the defence of penalty rates a key part of the election campaign.

All workplace agreements are meant to pass the “better off overall test” (BOOT), which is intended to ensure workers are paid more under workplace agreements than the award.

The Fair Work decision found the Coles agreement failed the test.

The tribunal has given Coles – Australia’s third largest employer – 10 days to provide undertakings to either compensate employees left worse off by working shifts with low penalties, or to overhaul rosters. If it fails to do so, the agreement will be ripped up.

The ruling comes after Fairfax Media this month revealed McDonald’s is also underpaying its Australian workers tens of millions of dollars a year under a deal struck with the SDA.

Some McDonald’s workers were paid nearly one-third less than the award, under a 2013 deal approved by the Fair Work Commission.

Fairfax Media revealed the underpayment scandal at Coles nearly a year ago, based on work by Josh Cullinan, a senior official at the National Tertiary Education Union, who has researched the Coles deal in a personal capacity.

On Tuesday Mr Cullinan said the tribunal’s most significant finding was that the agreement should never have passed the “better off overall test”.

“Make no mistake; if the Coles deal did not pass the [test] then the agreements for Woolworths, the Super Retail Group, Bunnings, McDonald’s … they are all likely not to pass,” he said.

“Over the next little while, we will have to see some sort of analysis of these agreements to find out how they came to be made.”

Mr Cullinan’s research on Coles found some low-paid workers were as much as $3500 a year worse off than the award. Last year Mr Cullinan, backed by the meatworkers’ union, challenged the deal at the Fair Work Commission.

As a result, Coles was forced to provide undertakings to lift casual loadings from 20 to 25 per cent and pay young workers more. Now it has also been told to pay higher penalty rates for weekend and night work.

Mr Hart, who triggered the Fair Work full bench hearing, said the tribunal ruling was “as clear a victory as we could have hoped for”.

He said the decision raised questions about deals struck across the retail and fast food sector by the SDA. “This is a repudiation of the SDA’s cosy deals with bosses,” Mr Hart said.

A Coles spokesman defended above inflation pay increases in its workplace agreements and said the company would “respond to today’s decision in due course”.

They would not comment on how much the decision could cost it.

In a written statement, SDA national secretary Gerard Dwyer said the union would review the tribunal decision.

“The SDA welcomes any move that improves the wages and conditions of any workers in Coles.”

Mr Dwyer has refused Fairfax Media requests for interviews in recent weeks about his union’s deals with both Coles and McDonald’s

Greens employment and industrial relations spokesman Adam Bandt attacked Coles for the underpayments, and praised those who had “courageously” stood up for weekend rates of pay.

“I want people to join their unions so that their unions can stand up for them, but doing rotten deals with Australia’s largest companies and trading away penalty rates isn’t the way to attract them.”

Opinion: moment of great shame for ColesThis is a moment of great shame for Australia’s ailing union movement and for one of this country’s most significant companies.

Australia largest private sector union, the Shop, Distributive and Allied Employees Association (SDA), has been caught out.

The ruse? Trading off the penalty rates and casual loadings of vulnerable, low paid workers in exchange, in many cases, for barely a handful of coins in extra hourly pay.

Tens of thousands of workers are worse off as a consequence.

It defies belief that Coles and the SDA didn’t know that they were agreeing to a deal that left some low paid workers as much as $3500 a year short of their entitlements.

The landmark Fair Work Commission decision is a stunning indictment, finding that the deal with Coles did not pass the “better off overall test”.

Put simply, this is the legal requirement that workers should be paid more in a workplace agreement than they are under the award, the basic safety net of wages and conditions.

This is not the only questionable deal inked by the “shoppies” union with big retailers.

It is likely up to half a million workers in Australia are being underpaid due to cosy deals struck between big companies and the SDA. That includes agreements struck with Woolworths and McDonald’s.

Just over a week ago Fairfax Mediarevealedthat some workers at McDonald’s were nearly a third worse off than the award with underpayment across the company of at least $50 million a year.

Both ACTU secretary Dave Oliver and Labor leader Bill Shorten have been running a campaign to “protect” penalty rates this federal election.

But instead of a sober self-assessment in the wake of the commission’s decision, all we got on Tuesday was evasion and pathetic spin from Oliver.

He defended the McDonald’s agreement (where young workers on $10 an hour are being underpaid) and said the commission’s decision in the Coles case showed the system is “working”.

It only ‘worked’ because the cosy deal was exposed by Fairfax Media a year ago, helped by the courage and research skills of an official from another union, Josh Cullinan.

The promise to protect penalty rates now looks like a sad joke from a labour movement with too few union members and far too many unions dominated by political hacks masquerading as officials.

Working conditions in Australia for low paid vulnerable workers, particularly temporary foreign workers, are getting worse. In nearly all cases there is no union representing them.

When the union is the SDA, sadly, vulnerable workers are probably better off with no union at all.

The benefit for the SDA in striking these deals is that the big employers are happy to have theirrepresentatives on site, signing up members.

That gives it influence in Labor, wherethe Catholic-dominated SDA uses its numbers to try block social policy change such as marriage equality. On the back of young workers, this union bolsters its conservative social agenda.

As for Coles, the third largest employer in Australiahas successfully re-branded itself with slick ads, cheap milk and store makeovers.

But one thing hasn’t changed. In collusion with the SDA it has been ripping its workers off for years. Those worst off? The most vulnerable. The young, and those on casual and part time shifts.

No amount of marketing can hide that.

Ben Schneiders, smh南京夜网419论坛

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Day to remember

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GRAND MEMORIES: Karyl Pearce, Elaine Rapson, Annette Howard and Melva Evans at the opening of the netball clubhouse on Saturday.The memories were fresh, the laughter contagious as four of Maitland’s longest serving members celebrated the opening of the new netball clubhouse on Saturday.
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Karyl Pearce, Elaine Rapson, Annette Howard and Melva Evans reprised memories as they gathered around a photo taken of them in their netball umprie uniforms in 1970.

There were numerous other similar gatherings asMaitland netball drew on a tradition of the past to signal in a new era.

A traditional march past involving team membersfrom all the Maitland Netball Association’s club symbolically marched from the old netball clubrooms to the new headquarters before they were officially opened by Maitland mayor Peter Blackmore.

It was a colourful procession which brought back memories for the mayor and the various life members who were special guests at the ceremony.

NSW Netball president Wendy Archer and presidents and officials from the Newcastle and Charlestown Netball Associations were special guests along withMaitland MP Jenny Aitchison,Maitland City councillors and representatives from The Mutual the major sponsor of Maitland netball.

Maitland Netball Association president Kim Starkey paid tribute to all those from council, state government and the netball association who had been involved in the planning, funding and construction of the new administration and clubhouse building.

TREASURED TIME: Karyl Pearce, Elaine Rapson, Annette Howard and Melva Evans in 1970 when they were photographed in their netball umpire uniforms.

Starkey said past president Bev Surplice, who unfortunately did not live to see the fruition of her dream, was the instigator behind the project 15 years ago.

“Bev had the vision more than 15 years ago that inspired the building of these new facilities for Maitland netball,” she said.“During those 15 years, many committee members have worked tirelessly to see her dream come to fruition.

“The clubhouse has been a joint venture with Maitland council and I would particularly like to that Ben Griffin, senior project architect at Maitland City Council, for all his hard work.

Day to remember The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

Maitland Netball Association president Kim Starkey and Maitland mayor Peter Blackmore receive help from some of Maitland netball’s younger members to officially open the associations new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Maitland Netball Association president Kim Starkey and Maitland mayor Peter Blackmore receive help from some of Maitland netball’s younger members to officially open the associations new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Maitland Netball president Kim Starkey, Netball NSW president Wendy Archer, Maitland Netball secretary Leearna Bennett, umpires co-ordinator Sharon McVean and Maitland committee member Cassie Swalwell. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Karyl Pearce, Elaine Rapson, Annette Howard and Melva Evans with a photo taken of them as netball umpires in 1970. Picture; MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Maitland netball life members Shirley Scholes and Irene Hemsworth. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Charlestown Netball Association’s Gail Mayers and Dianne Pasoce, Maitland’s Barbie Bird, Newcastle Netball Association president Del Saunders and Easts Jenny Fullford. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Maitland MP Jenny Aitchison and Cherryl Clarke. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Rhonda Daniel, Susan McGregor and Wendy Archer. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Vicki Bellamy, Annette Howard, Carolyn Bieman-King, Rosie Bieman, Paula Thomson, Barry Evans and Rae Moss. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

Kim Starkey and Leearna Bennett. Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The life members gather to cut the cake to mark the official opening.Picture: MICHAEL HARTSHORN

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The march past before the official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

The official opening of Maitland netball’s new headquarters. Picture: MAX MASON-HUBERS

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Letters to the editor

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Showing supportfor our dairy farmersWell it looks like the big multi-million dollar companies have bitten off more than they can chew when they took on the dairy farmers.
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We all know and have known for years that the poor farmers do it tough. I am sure that the farmers appreciate now how grateful we are as consumers now they see the support they are getting from their communities. Doesn’t it make you proud to be Australian when we all stand together and say enough is enough. To be able to take a moral stand and bite back at them.

We have let them know that it doesn’t matter how much they discount their product. The cheap milk is soured by the grief of the farmers and their families and until they get a fair deal it will not pass our lips.

We are proud to be behind our farmers in the south-west.

David MacPhail, Warrnambool

Private sector needs to reward farmersMurray Goulburn suppliers are suppressing their power if they remain complacent about the recent farm milk gate price clawback. Whilst the cooperative structure is not what it once was, farmers’ rights in the structure are substantial and should be exercised to ensure that the board’s decision is not tolerated now or in the future.

The clawback has not taken account of the message relayed by Murray Goulburn in the 2015 restructure that‘Murray Goulburn is pursuing an optimum Capital Structure that will see 100 per centsupplier control of the co-operative maintained…This growth strategy has the aim of increasing farm gate returns to our suppliers who are at the heart of our business’.

By signing up to a class action, unit-holding farmers should not be thought of as ‘going after their own’ but rather ensuring that they remain at the heart of the Murray Goulburn business. The action could be brought by way of a potential injunction or compensation for the clawback, which may be financed by the board’s professional indemnity insurers.

It is of course almost to be expected that Murray Goulburn will maintain a strategy of broadcasting a message that any farmer action will damage shareholders and potentially cause the demise of Murray Goulburn, however I think the Murray Goulburn agenda speaking against a class action is clear to all.

Governments cannot sustain handouts. It is up to the private sector to ensure that there is lasting restitution for the dairy farmers and the local economy which they support. As outlined by the Federal Court‘It has been long recognised that shareholder class actions hold corporations and their officers to account above and beyond any penalties imposed in the regulatory regimes and so contribute to a culture of good corporate governance.’

Nb:Although the author is a solicitor, he is not involved in any existing class-action and writes in his capacity as a member of a dairy farming family (non-Murray Goulburn suppliers) with concern for the future of this important industry.

Edward Mahony, Warrnambool

Murray Goulburn’s take on the dairy crisisSince announcing our revised farmgate price five weeks ago, Murray Goulburn Co-operative has been justifiably criticised for letting our farmer-suppliers down and causing industry turmoil.

And while the debate about Murray Goulburn and the dairy industry more broadly will continue for some time, it’s important that it does so with knowledge of the facts.

Australians love their dairy, in fact we have one of the highest rates of dairy consumption in the world. However, the country produces around 35 percent more milk than it can possibly consume and that milk supply has to find a market elsewhere.

Murray Goulburn is Australia’s largest dairy exporter and we derive around half our sales from international markets.

As a result we are more exposed than most Australian dairy companies to the vagaries of commodity markets and foreign exchange. Dairy commodity markets have fallen sharply in the past year, trading at levels not seen since the global financial crisis – when Australian processors were also forced to reduce farmgate milk prices.

Murray Goulburn has navigated this difficult environment by producing dairy food products and added value ingredients which deliver higher returns and reduce exposure to bulk commodities. Ultimately these efforts were not enough.

Supermarket brands have been singled out as one of the causes of dairy’s woes, but in fact the opposite is true. Our 10-year daily pasteurised milk supply contract with Coles is a very good deal for our farmers.It delivers a premium above the farmgate milk price and a guaranteed market for our farmers’ milk. It has helped secure much needed investment in the sector.

So while I applaud the support consumers have shown for the dairy industry, boycotting supermarket brand milk in the end doesn’t help our farmers or our industry.It doesn’t matter which milk you buy, what matters is that you keep buying milk and all the other dairy products you love to consume. Global commodity markets will rebalance in time, but the timing of that recovery is beyond our control.

What is in our control is how we invest our capital to deliver value above whatever commodity markets deliver and that we continue in our efforts to carry our suppliers through this downturn, which is delivering unsustainable milk prices to dairy farmers throughout the world. We remain confident of the long term prospects for Australia’s dairy industry and that improved milk prices will ultimately return for our farmers.

Philip Tracy, chairman Murray Goulburn Co-operative Co. Limited

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Narooma News lettersJune 1

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Support our dairy farmersMost of us love our milk, either on our cereal or in our cappuccino.For the past few years ourdairyfarmers have been hit hard with deregulation and the milk price war. It takes a farmer 38 cents to produce a litre of milk and up until recently farmers have been paid 42 cents a litre. Processors such as Murray Goulburn and Fonterra have now decided to paydairyfarmers 37 cents a litre which is less than what it takes the farmer to produce a litre of milk.
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For the next few months many farmers now have to survive on being paid just 14 cents a litre to make up the difference from being paid 42 cents a litre back to 37 cents. This has a devastating effect ondairyfarming families causing many of them to walk off their farms. Dairyfarmers generally work 365 days a year working extraordinary hours without the benefits most of us receive in employment such as long service leave, annual leave or medical leave. If we don’t support our diary farmers by paying the correct price for milk we will be buying milk from overseas soon. The milk will be nowhere near the quality of our beautiful Australiandairyfarms where the cows can freely roam in paddocks of fresh green grass.

This community has already seen the timber and fishing industry affected so let’s do all we can to support and sustain our localdairy industry. The next time you buy milk, spare a thought for ourdairyfarmers and buy branded milk.

Rachel Summerell,Verona

Election signsHere we go again with political posters put on trees. The Liberal Party have already placed a sign for Peter Hendy at the Mystery Bay Road turn-off. This is absolute pollution, especially on a lovely big tree contrary to council policy. Please have respect for our trees and residents. I trust council will have them removed post haste. By the way, it’s good to know what Dr Hendy looks like.

Barry Wells, Mystery Bay

Grey nurse sharksWe welcome the increase in the numbers of sharksthis year and hope it is an indication that the species is starting to rebound. But while this summer was encouraging, it will be a long time before we can be confident that the sharks are out of danger.Two recent letters to the Narooma News pushed the opinion that the sharks are not critically endangered. The two letters seem to be based on a complete misunderstanding.“Critically endangered” is a classification used to guide government action as to what to do when the number of a species falls to a point where there are concerns about its survival. Decisions about the classification of sharks are made by the independent NSW Fisheries Scientific Committee, which reviewed the evidence and decided in 2008 that the East Coast Grey Nurse Shark population should be moved from “endangered” status to “critically endangered”, which means “facing an extremely high risk of extinction in the immediate future”.

There has been debate over the years about just how many Grey Nurse Sharks remain, with earlier estimates that put the number at around 300 subsequently raised to around 1500 – 2000, with a sizeable margin of uncertainty due to the inherent difficulties in counting and estimating. However the fact that the Fisheries Scientific Committee has maintained the critically endangered classification shows their numbers remain far too low. A NSW Fisheries discussion paper of 2011 stated that the sharks are “unlikely to be downgraded from their critically endangered status while the population is below a threshold of 5000 individuals”.No-one disputes that the numbers of Grey Nurse Sharks have fallen dramatically. We continue to see photos showing that they face an ongoing threat from hook injuries. Everyone values the image of the South Coast as a place where the natural environment is still largely undisturbed and where native wildlife is plentiful. This is fundamental to our tourist industry. It would be a positive thing for our region and our community if we had a healthy population of Grey Nurse Sharks.

JennyEdwards,Nature Coast Marine Group president

Brumbies and BatsEmily Barton’s recent bat article has suggested involvement of the third tier of Government.Ifthis includes Liberal PeterHendy and Labor Mike Kelly, we will be in trouble.Hendy will be in hiselement welding his “knife”and Andrew will have “fired up” his chain saw.In a bi-partisan move, Major Mike Kelly and Dr Hendy will barrel bomb much of theelectorate with personalized pamphlets, bat contraceptive gas and pellets of NPWS 1080.The initial assault led by GM “Cathy”, wearing a laser-emitting fluorescent skirt,clanging a tambourine and blowing a horn with the “deputy mayor in waitingscuttling behind her. He will be beating a drum and cymbals whilst blowing the bag pipes.

This will certainly disperse some bats from the Catalina Golf course, the Soldiers Club, the Water Gardenand towards Moyura, Turros Heads and Narooma GolfCourse.Every bat will be so frightened they will make alow level “long drop”over the Eurobodalla water supply.

It isbelieved the mayor and NPWSare fast tracking a joint management plan for a combined brumby and bat shoot.This will involve the mayor, the shooters party and HuntFest.To satisfy the environmental movement,ammunition will be designed to temporarily restrict the flying capacity of the bats andoperations will be carried out just before and after milking operations to prevent anydamage to the sheds and bats accidentally disabled by stampeding cattle and brumbies.Several squadrons of specially designed highly pitched“drones” will be released.One cannot dismiss the “crisis “has been engineered by the mayorand three of his supporting councilors.

Peter Bernard,Dalmeny

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Students embrace culture

Written by admin on 19/06/2019 Categories: 南京夜网

Students embrace culture Uncle Jack Charles, Trent Nelson and Rebecca Phillips answer questions from students after their performance. Picture: DARREN HOWE
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Trent Nelson, Uncle Jack Charles and Rebecca Phillips. Picture: DARREN HOWE

Uncle Jack Charles, Trent Nelson and Rebecca Phillips answer questions from students after their performance. Picture: DARREN HOWE

Rebecca Phillips, Uncle Jack Charles and Trent Nelson. Picture: DARREN HOWE

Uncle Jack Charles, Trent Nelson and Rebecca Phillips answer questions from students after their performance. Picture: DARREN HOWE

Uncle Jack Charles, Trent Nelson and Rebecca Phillips answer questions from students after their performance. Picture: DARREN HOWE

Uncle Jack Charles. Picture: DARREN HOWE

Lockwood Primary School students learn about Aboriginal artwork with Damian Saunders and Margot Feast at Bendigo Art Gallery. Picture: CHRIS PEDLER

Lockwood Primary School students learn about Aboriginal artwork with Damian Saunders and Margot Feast at Bendigo Art Gallery. Picture: CHRIS PEDLER

Lockwood Primary School students learn about Aboriginal artwork with Damian Saunders and Margot Feast at Bendigo Art Gallery. Picture: CHRIS PEDLER

Quarry Hills Primary School students learn Indigenous Dance. Picture: DARREN HOWE

Quarry Hills Primary School students learn Indigenous Dance. Picture: DARREN HOWE

TweetFacebookWe just want kids to understand about their backyard, their country around Bendigo and the area’s importance.

Damian SaundersUlumbarra show returns to theatreBendigo’s newest theatre hosted a show for students as part of Reconciliation Week yesterday.

The performance–called Ulumbarra:Gather Together–is acollection of Indigenous performers, artists and musicians gathered together to present a work dedicated theDja Dja Wurrung story and song.

It was commissionedfor the opening of Ulumbarra Theatre in 2015 and has returned this year by popular demand.

Trent Nelson, Uncle Jack Charles and Rebecca Phillips perform together in Ulumbarra: Gather Together at Ulumbarra Theatre. Picture: DARREN HOWE

Starring Uncle Jack Charles, Ulumbarra will be performed during the day for groups of school children as well as Thursday and Friday night for thepublic at Ulumbarra.

“We have done small events before butthis one is unprecedented,”Capital Venues and Events manager David Lloydsaid.

“It’s not just local schools, they are coming fromMaryborough and Echuca, schools from different regions are coming together across clan lines and living the Ulumbarra name by comingto one spot.”

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Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions reviewing child pornography case

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No jail time for child porn guilty pleaThe Office of theDirector of Public Prosecutions NSW has confirmed it is reviewing the decision of one of its solicitors not to push for full-time jail for a man who pleaded guilty to the possession of child pornography.

Joel Adam Fletcher narrowly avoided a custodial sentence last week in Bega Local Court after he was found in the possession of 148 images portraying the exploitation of childrenbelieved to be aged between 10 and 13.

The 29-year-old was handeda two year suspended sentence and ordered to pay $5000 by a bewilderedMagistrate Doug Dick on Tuesday, May 24 after Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) solicitor Brett Diggins did not request Fletcher be placed in full-time custody.

“I am going to be honest, I came here prepared to send you to full-time jail, the DPP (Director of Public Prosecutions) is not asking for that,” Magistrate Dick said during his sentencing of Fletcher.

“Material such as this can’t come into existence without the exploitation of children.

“It surprises me that the DPP aren’t asking for full-time jail, but they’re not.”

Despite not requesting a full-time sentence, DPP solicitor Brett Diggins did state the offence called for a “strong message from the courts”, and hequestioned the man’s denialsof any sexual gratification from the images.

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No more hibernation as gym opens doors for fun

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PUMPING IRON: Junee fitness trainers Ben Brown and Cam Hands are ready to welcome locals to the rec centre now that winter has arrived. Picture: Declan Rurenga
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Instead of hibernating in front of Netflix and the heater, Junee recreation centre staff have kicked off a program to encourage members to get inside and get active.

With winter finally here, the centre is setting down the challenge for locals to maintain and improve their fitness as well as rewarding their members.

Aneight-week fitness challenge started this week and is just one of the ideas as well as a free movie, a seminar on healthy eatingand a social media challenge.

“Winter is here and we want to help people stay motivated,active and social,” council’scommunity development manager David Koren said.

“The person who attends the most group fitness classes wins a prize.”

For Junee Junction members, the entire program –even the movie night -is free.

Mr Koren said with 24 classes run across a week –it would be tough to win the eight-week challenge but there are other prizes as well.

As part of the program the ever-popular Zumba class will be held at the recreation centre for the first time.Mr Koren said it could potentially become a permanent fixture.

“We’ve got three new group fitness classes, and fitness and aquatic bootcamps,” he said.

“It’s not all health and fitness,it’s about fun.”

Mr Koren said the exact dates of the program would be revealed over the next eight weeks.

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Robbo helps Crows turn pink for a big footy day

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STAR: Former AFL player Russell Roberston attempts a screamer for Burnie in a TSL match against Launceston. Robertson will line up for the Scottsdale Crows with Brodie Holland for their pink sports day in the NEFU on Saturday.
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Former AFL players Russell Robertson and Brodie Holland will line-up for the Scottsdale Crows against Winnaleah in their home NEFU clash on Saturday on a big “Pink Sports” day for the club.

The marquee players will conduct a junior footy clinic at noon and will stay on for a sports night function from 7.30pm, with a $20 entry fee and a lucky door prize voucher of a Tamar River cruise for two.

An auction will held for memorabilia items including a 2016 full-team signed Melbourne jumper, Jesse Hogan boots, a Josh Gibson-signed football and a Hawks jumper signed by Sam Mitchell.

A gold coin donation at gate entry will put patrons into a draw for a prize of two nights accommodation at White Sands, Scamander, valued at $500, which will be drawn at three-quarter time.

A chocolate wheel will be held during the day with prizesalong with a silent auction and pink tins will be taken around the ground for donations for the cancer foundation.

“Two cancer survivors involved with our club inPat Westlake and life member Toni Harris will toss the coin at the start of the reserves and senior games,”Crows president DarrenBreen said.

“We hope to get some people in and raise some money for cancer and obviously for the footy club.”

The best player will receive the Shane Makinen Medal.

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Cloncurry Winter Races | Photos

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Cloncurry Winter Races | Photos UP CLOSE: Dan Van Liessum, Abby Tapp, 3, and Amelia Robertson.
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RED CARPET TREATMENT: Kim Walden, Eloise Kippers, Lisa Monks, Matthew Chambers, Malissa Tapp, Tanya Brown, Robyn Jenkins, Kristy Hows.

OUTING: Kit Rix, Alannah Smith, Ella Scanlan, 3, Haylee Scanlan, Liam Scanlan, Abbie Lewanownsky, Trent Stanyer, Harvey Stanyer, 1.

SMILES: Cody Young, Tammy Young, Fallon Taylor, and Sarah Hoare.

PHOTOGENIC: Jodie Mara with Rory, 10 months.

AT THE TRACK: Kye Wehrman and Andrew Gertz.

WELL BEHAVED: Kieran Weller, Ashley Speidel, and Warren Weller have a good time.

BIRTHDAY CELEBRATIONS: Edie Harrison, Archie Harrison, Ryan Young, 6, Mary Harrison, who turned 80 years old last Friday night, Scott Harrison, Erin Harrison, and Rachel Brand.

CATCH-UPS: Zane Donavan, Sparrow Harrison, and Scott Harrison.

GOOD TIMES: Erin Harrison, Emily Bosnjak, Archie Harrison, and Bianka Bosnjak.

PUNTERS: Drew Alexion and Matt Said.

DAY OUT: Mikaela Tapp, Ann-louise Connelly and Monique Tapp.

BEST DRESSED JUNIOR GIRL: Skye Wehrman presented her award by Dale Grobler, from the Leichhardt Hotel.

BEST DRESSED BOY: Cade Ferguson.

BEST DRESSED MALE: Peter Bakker presented his award by Brad Edgar.

COMPETITIVE: The line-up of Fashions on the Field lady entrants at the Cloncurry Winter Races last Saturday.

BEST DRESSED CLASSIC LADY: Dale Gobler presents the award to Lucy Whitbread.

CONTEMPORARY LADY: Fashions on the Field winner Chauney Dodd, and Brad Edgar.

FINAL RACE: The fifth race of the Cloncurry Winter Races was the Sparrow Harrison Snr Memorial. Tamara Tincknell rides Larabee to victory.

FRIENDLY SERVICE: Colin Ferguson serves professional bullrider Troy Mara a beer. Mr Mara was in Cloncurry for his grandmother’s 80th birthday.

GOOD TIMES: Chris Moren and Shannon Moren.

ENTERTAINING: Jasper Robertson, 22 months, and Lacey Moren, 1, enjoy some play time between races.

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